So Who Needs to do STCW95 Crew Basis Training?

Wherever crew choose to do basic training and whatever they pay it is a lot of money when you don’t have a job! Quite simply, you need a job to pay for basic training and you need basic training to get a job! Sound familiar? So do you REALLY need to do basic training or is this a myth that no-one has thought to challenge? Here I am going to explore the realities and the myths that surround this subject. I shall start with a simple answer to the above question; the answer is NO! and also YES! Oh dear! Now I sound like a lawyer. So let’s start with the legal facts…….who LEGALLY must attend basic training? That’s easy to answer for some people. Anyone who wishes to obtain a Yacht Rating Certificate, an Officer of the Watch, Chief Mate or Masters certificate or anyone who wishes to attend the Medical First Aid course or gain a Certificate of Proficiency in Survival Craft and Rescue boats must obtain the relevant basic training module before they can even be admitted to the advanced course. As far as the other members of the crew are concerned Section 6.1 of the STCW convention states clearly that: “seafarers employed or engaged in any capacity on board on the business of the ship as part of the ships compliment with designated safety or pollution prevention duties shall, before being assigned any shipboard duties [attend 4 element basic training]” So, in fact the rules have stopped short of formally requiring all yacht crew to attend as an automatic requirement. They have said that all crew who have a nominated role in the emergency organisation should attend 4 element basic training. So what does THAT mean? It is possible to imagine that on a passenger ship with a crew of maybe 1500 there could be a few of them spare in an emergency but in a yacht crew of, say ,15 it is hard to imagine someone without something to do in an emergency! It means that nannies, masseurs, secretaries, butlers and security guards etc. do not need to do basic training but, practically speaking, everyone else does. But to hell with legal requirements! Basic training is not about legal technicalities. It is about YOUR safety and the safety of your fellow crew members and your guests. The MCA place a lot of emphasis on the importance of this programme and you should note the recent comments by the Chief Examiner, Captain Roger Towner at a PYA seminar, to the effect that they consider that five full days of instruction are needed as a minimum for the course material to be properly presented. A course provider in Budapest was specifically mentioned as being sub standard; using videos instead of practical training, they ran all four courses plus Crisis Management and Crowd Control in one weekend! Don’t sell yourself short – train properly! Don’t forget that basic training is only the first step in gaining the professional knowledge that new crew need to be safe and effective team members; the other key element is the yacht specific training that should be organised on board. So in the end the answer is an emphatic YES! Those who have not taken their basic training courses already find it difficult to find work whether on large yachts or small. Management companies and crew are all making it a requirement. But the thing to remember is that there is a reason for this: these courses are genuinely REALLY IMPORTANT! Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=319216&ca=Jobs

Tipping Etiquette For Your Scuba Crew An article by Ian Scott with 354 words and 337 views

Don’t ask. The answer is a resounding “Yes”! You should tip. When you go on a chartered and chaperoned dive through a commercial diving shop, it is customary to tip both the Captain and the DiveMaster. Gratuities are voluntary, incumbent on your generosity. Even so, it is appropriate to offer a tip for your scuba crew. If you are going out for one day, it is important to bring some cash on the boat for tipping. If you are diving with the same DiveMaster and Captain for an entire week, it is acceptable to offer a tip at the end of the week. If you are arranging a variety of dives through a dive shop, you may not have the same Captain or DiveMaster on each dive, so daily tipping is a better idea unless you are certain that your crew will be consistent for the entire duration of your stay. One perspective is to compare the roles of Captain and DiveMaster to other industries where tipping is expected. Your Captain is analogous to a taxi driver, transporting you safely to and from your scuba destination. An acceptable tip for a taxi driver is 10% to 15% of the fare; a similar rate for the Captain is appropriate. On a single-tank dive for $65, your tip to the Captain should be between $6 and $9 USD. Your DiveMaster should be more generously tipped with 15% – or more, if the service was exceptional. On a $65 single-tank dive, tip your DiveMaster between $8 and $12 USD. Do not skimp your tip due to variations in the local currency. If you are traveling in an area with an embarrassingly favorable exchange rate, do not lower your tip just because the local economy is cheap. To a boat Captain in Florida, $15USD is an acceptable token of gratitude for a nice trip. To a Captain in rural Honduras, $15USD is a generous gift. Give your generous gifts where they are most needed – to DiveMasters offering good service in economically challenged regions. Keep in mind that some crews derive much, and sometimes nearly all, of their income from gratuities. Stay cool, and keep on diving! Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=44703&ca=Recreation

If you have ever stayed overnight with relatives or friends, then you know how challenging it can be to get “settled” in the guest room. If you have guests staying over, you no doubt want to make your guests feel as welcome as possible in your guest room. You also want them to be comfortable and get a good night’s sleep. Showing your guests your unparalleled hospitality isn’t that difficult. A good way to make a guest feel welcome is to prepare for the guest’s arrival from their perspective by asking yourself what would make you feel more at home. Cleaning the Room It is important that you clean the guest room thoroughly before the guest arrives. When not in use, the guest bedroom in many homes becomes a “catch all” room, so be sure to get rid of any clutter before the guest arrives. Otherwise, the guest may feel like they are sleeping in a storage closet. Weather permitting, open the windows and let some fresh air into the room. Dust the room completely, vacuum, and sweep down any dust tags from the corners. The Bed Although no guest expects that your guest room mattresses will rival those of the Ritz Carlton, they do expect that the mattresses they sleep on will provide them with a comfortable night’s sleep. As a rule of thumb, don’t use mattresses in the guest room that you wouldn’t sleep on yourself; in other words, if you just bought a new mattress and stuck your old, worn mattress in the guest room, your guest may be offended at the gesture. Decent mattresses for the guest room are a must. You should also avoid sticking a sofa bed in the guest room and opt instead for a full size bed. Be sure that there is a night stand or side table by the bed that is equipped with a lamp. Bedding The linens on your guest bed should be freshly changed before the guest arrives. If you haven’t touched the bed since last Christmas, now’s the time to put freshly laundered sheets, pillow cases, blankets, quilts, comforters, or other bedding on the bed. The pillows on the bed should be pillows that you wouldn’t mind sleeping with, either. And be sure to go for four pillows for a standard bed; most folks sleep with more than one pillow, so two pillows per guest is essential. In addition to the bedding on the bed, stock the guest room with a couple of extra blankets, just in case they like their bed a bit warmer. Relaxing If the guest room has ample space, include a comfortable chair and ottoman or a recliner and side table for the guest to use for relaxation. Chances are that you won’t be entertaining the guest for their entire stay, and this gives them a private getaway spot to read a book or work a crossword puzzle. Bathroom Many guest bedrooms have bathrooms, but this is not always the case. If you don’t have a guest bathroom, designate one of your bathrooms as the guest bathroom during their stay. This will give the guest a chance to unpack their toiletries. Stock the guest bathroom with fresh towels, shampoo, conditioner, body wash, extra toilet tissue, and other essentials.

If you’re delving into the world of making money online, it’s inevitable that you’ll come across information about a program called StomperNet. If you’re looking for StomperNet reviews, you can find out a lot about the program and how it works as well as read testimonials from other users of this program who will often be more than delighted to talk about their experience with the program. There are also a number of people looking to discredit StomperNet and lure you into their similar programs. What is StomperNet? StomperNet is an elite club of individuals who are getting direct access to information from a group of very successful online entrepreneurs. This membership program is quite pricey and there’s a lot of hype about it but the more you delve into it, the more excited you’re bound to get. Reading StomperNet reviews can help you determine whether or not you want to take the plunge and invest into this program. You might have trouble getting in but that shouldn’t stop you from moving forward and getting the type of business success you want. The individuals who started the program offered limited seats to it which was something quite unique in the world of internet marketing. Conferences, videos, books, discussion forums and the famous StomperNet Portal were offered to members. The first small group of individuals got to learn how to put their time and efforts in the right areas to maximize their ROI in internet marketing. Instead of a flood of information out to the general public, this program gave special access to a select few who were willing to pay for the service. At $750.00 for a one year membership, not everyone jumped on board straight away. Many people waited for the reviews to come out. By the time many learned that those who got in on the ground floor were making killer cash in their online businesses, it was too late to jump in, the program’s doors were closed. Some squeezed in and some waited on a list to get into the program, wanting desperately to learn the secrets of online success. Today, you’ll get plenty of spin off programs and regurgitated information from many other people who will take the StomperNet crew obtained knowledge and use it to continue to build upon that success. There have also been subsequent opportunities to get into the successful program. Many of the philosophies have turned viral and there’s a new generation of successful online entrepreneurs who want to share their knowledge with some protégés. How can you capitalize on the success of StomperNet if you didn’t get in? There are new generations of the program being released regularly and some of the students of the original StomperNet program are now recruiting their own protégés. You can definitely benefit even if you don’t learn about internet marketing through Brad Fallon and Andy Jenkins directly. If you do a bit of homework and read some StomperNet reviews, you’ll find that many who paid subscriptions into the program earned their membership fee back many fold in a short period of time. Yes, it can be difficult to distinguish a great opportunity from a lot of hype in this day and age and that’s why you should always look to places that offer unbiased reviews for help and guidance. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=215468&ca=Marketing

Making a Guest Feel Welcome in Your Guest Room

If you have ever stayed overnight with relatives or friends, then you know how challenging it can be to get “settled” in the guest room. If you have guests staying over, you no doubt want to make your guests feel as welcome as possible in your guest room. You also want them to be comfortable and get a good night’s sleep. Showing your guests your unparalleled hospitality isn’t that difficult. A good way to make a guest feel welcome is to prepare for the guest’s arrival from their perspective by asking yourself what would make you feel more at home. Cleaning the Room It is important that you clean the guest room thoroughly before the guest arrives. When not in use, the guest bedroom in many homes becomes a “catch all” room, so be sure to get rid of any clutter before the guest arrives. Otherwise, the guest may feel like they are sleeping in a storage closet. Weather permitting, open the windows and let some fresh air into the room. Dust the room completely, vacuum, and sweep down any dust tags from the corners. The Bed Although no guest expects that your guest room mattresses will rival those of the Ritz Carlton, they do expect that the mattresses they sleep on will provide them with a comfortable night’s sleep. As a rule of thumb, don’t use mattresses in the guest room that you wouldn’t sleep on yourself; in other words, if you just bought a new mattress and stuck your old, worn mattress in the guest room, your guest may be offended at the gesture. Decent mattresses for the guest room are a must. You should also avoid sticking a sofa bed in the guest room and opt instead for a full size bed. Be sure that there is a night stand or side table by the bed that is equipped with a lamp. Bedding The linens on your guest bed should be freshly changed before the guest arrives. If you haven’t touched the bed since last Christmas, now’s the time to put freshly laundered sheets, pillow cases, blankets, quilts, comforters, or other bedding on the bed. The pillows on the bed should be pillows that you wouldn’t mind sleeping with, either. And be sure to go for four pillows for a standard bed; most folks sleep with more than one pillow, so two pillows per guest is essential. In addition to the bedding on the bed, stock the guest room with a couple of extra blankets, just in case they like their bed a bit warmer. Relaxing If the guest room has ample space, include a comfortable chair and ottoman or a recliner and side table for the guest to use for relaxation. Chances are that you won’t be entertaining the guest for their entire stay, and this gives them a private getaway spot to read a book or work a crossword puzzle. Bathroom Many guest bedrooms have bathrooms, but this is not always the case. If you don’t have a guest bathroom, designate one of your bathrooms as the guest bathroom during their stay. This will give the guest a chance to unpack their toiletries. Stock the guest bathroom with fresh towels, shampoo, conditioner, body wash, extra toilet tissue, and other essentials. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=566530&ca=Home+Management

How To Make A Guest Feel At Home In A Guest Room

If you’ve finally saved enough to buy a home with a guest room, you might be wondering how to decorate it. There are a number of ways to make your guest feel at home even when they’re not. Many of the hotels and motels have been doing this sort of thing for years, and you can take some cues from them. Simply understand what the needs of your guest might be and be sure to keep those items handy so that they feel welcomed in your home. The Bedroom Most guest rooms should come with a television set and phone to make them appealing for long-term guests. If you aren’t expecting long-term guests, then a comfortable bed with plenty of pillows is still a must. For winter, make sure the room is sufficiently warm either by opening the vents or by having enough blankets on the bed. If they need more, you should show them where they are stored. For summer, there should be sufficient ventilation with fans or air conditioners to make sure they sleep well at night. The curtains or blinds in the room should be easy to close and allow enough light in when open to illuminate the space. Furniture can consist of an empty bureau, a bookcase, and a small workspace with a chair for writing, reading, or to use a laptop. The Separate Bathroom If your guest room comes with a separate bathroom be sure to stock it with the necessary toiletries. Have shaving cream, soaps, shampoos, and all manner of hygienic products available. If you can get these in travel sizes, all the better. There should be mirror space in the bathroom to help your guest dress and present him or herself. The guest bathroom should have more than one set of towels and the guest should be shown where they could get more. Additional Items Some people like to put a small refrigerator in the guest space for the guest’s own drinks and snacks. This is a nice touch but is not necessary. Trash cans should be available in both the bedroom and bathroom. They should be emptied out every so often for the guest. Don’t forget to have empty hangers and shelves available in the closets for your guest. They will need to hang some of their items up. Within the closet offer an ironing board and iron too. Making a room feel homey is also about decorating in a casual and contemporary style. If you make a room too elegant, your more casual guests might feel intimidated. If you make it too country, some of your guests might privately find it hokey. Since tastes differ amongst people, a guest room should be functional and conservative in style while adding a few contemporary pieces of artwork or furniture for interest. Keep the colors to the neutral palette, which most people find appealing and you will come off as a very gracious and caring host. Published at: https://www.isnare.com/?aid=134320&ca=Advice

Common Cruise Ship Injuries Experienced by Crew Members

When you think of cruise ship injury claims, you immediately think of guests aboard a cruise ship who are injured due to no fault of their own and laying a claim against the cruise company. What many people don’t realize is that crew members are at just as high risk and when working on a ship for months at a time, the chances of injury is significantly increased.

The truth of the matter is that crew members also experience a range of injuries while working aboard ships. What many crew members don’t realize is that they need to follow the same routine as guests in the event of an accident and have the same right to claim against the company for medical expenses, loss of income and more.

The most common cruise ship injuries for both guests and crew members are slips and falls. The decks can turn to slippery slides once wet, which means around the pool and during winds, the sea can splash onto the deck making them a danger zone. Staircases, bathrooms and darkened corridors are also responsible for the high volume of slips and falls aboard a ship. From bruises to broken bones, crew members can experience it all, all of which are liable for a claim for compensation.

One of the other very common cruise ship injuries experienced by crew members which result in them approaching the assistance of cruise ship injury attorneys is repetitive knee injury. Due to their constant moving around the ship or sitting for extended time, crew members are at a higher risk of experiencing this painful knee injury which damages the cartilage and leaves them unable to work in this profession. As you can imagine this results in a loss of income and the inability to continue a career on cruise ships moving forward.

It is the cruise company’s job to ensure that they provide a seaworthy vessel with working equipment. There are times where broken equipment can cause unwelcome injuries to crew members. It is imperative that all crew members are adequately trained on how to use equipment to reduce the risk of injury, but even with training carried out, there are times where equipment will fail, which an lead to burns, broken bones and other injuries which are liable for a claim.

Another issue which is often seen with crew members is injuries occurring due to lifting heavy items. It is important for the cruise ship to have a strict health and safety manual in place and train crew members on the correct ways to lift heavier items. There are times where members will need to move heavier items and failing to follow protocol or inadequate training can result in serious injury. This can happen on deck, around the pool and even when stocking the bar.

As with guests who sustain an injury on board and seek assistance from a cruise ship injury attorney, crew members need to do the same. There is a set way to ensure you gather all the relevant information to help attorneys manage your case effectively.

The first step after a cruise ship injury is to head to the medical doctor and seek treatment. You need to do that before anything, your health is the most important factor. The medical doctor may be able to provide you with the relevant care or you may be required to be taken to the nearest land hospital for treatment. The cruise doctor will be have to make this decision.

You also need to ensure that you report the accident to your superior or the captain and get a copy of the written report. Take photographs of where the accident happened and get any information on any witnesses, this will all be valuable to your case once you approach a cruise ship injury attorney.

About Us: Crew Advocacy is a personal injury and commercial litigation law specialist with over twenty years industry experience. This law firm offers their services in Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade country. They are a team of bilingual professionals ranging from lawyers to support staff who handle a high volume of maritime claims ranging from wage disputes to personal injury claims and harassment cases to wrongful death, medical malpractice and more. Crew Advocacy offer a professional service working to a fast resolution. They ensure their clients understand the process, offering a wealth of information and a high level of service. To find out more, visit http://www.crewadvocacy.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/expert/Edison_Vargas/1672481

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A Look at Some of the Best Crewed Charter Yachts in the Caribbean

As another Season begins in the Caribbean I thought I would write a bit about some of my favourite crewed yachts out there. I have picked a selection of boats ranging from 45 to 80 Feet, all boats that I personally have been on and Crews that I personally have met (and would recommend!). As it is a favoured chartering ground for many most of these Yachts are based in the British Virgin Islands, some however do charter in the Leeward and Windward Islands (St Maarteen, Antigua, Grenadines etc). Really when it comes down to it though the BVI does have everything to offer, with hundreds of islands in the area you can choose from quiet & secluded anchorages, to busy beach bars and lively restaurants.

Take a look at our suggestions and see what you think:

Viking Dream (Leopard 4700)- An Immaculate and Comfortable Yacht, Viking Dream is personally Owned buy its wonderful Crew Mark and Sally. They are a fun and experienced crew with a love for Chartering and the Islands, a perfect boat for 3 couples or a family Mark & Sally can adapt to either. Their enthusiasm, fun personalities and years of experience will ensure that your vacation in the British Virgin Islands is one that you will never forget.

AdAstra (Lagoon 57)- Bridget and Barry are a seasoned Crew who have been running charters on Ad Astra for 4 years now. With a zest for adventure they love to travel when working and when on vacation, they are sure to have many stories and experiences to share with you. AdAstra is a well kept boat, with many new additions each year. She sleeps 8 people in 3 Queens and 1 Bunk Beds, with a great out side dining area as well as a large salon. Perfect for Couples and Families. In May, Ad Astra will be heading over to the Mediterranean more Adventures so either make the most of then in the Caribbean or try an adventure with them in Corsica and Sardinia this Summer. Bridget and Barry are fun, considerate and always aiming to please. Their love of AdAstra and chartering is shown in the presentation of the Yacht… Chartering with them is a once in a lifetime vacation, you will want to go back again and again!

Pas De Deux (Fountaine Pajot 60) – Rodrigo and Kerry embody everything that is needed to be a fantastic charter crew, they have been in the British Virgin Islands for several years now and after perviously running larger yachts they prefer the more personal aspect of chartering with just 2 crew. Pas De Deux offers an added bit of luxury in the decor of a charter yacht, with Kerry presenting it beautifully, you will find hidden extras such as bath robes and personalised towels that you may not find on all our yachts. Rodrigo and Kerry bring with them their high standards and a personal touch that will not be missed. Pas De Deux offers 3 Queen Cabins, the Master offering a walk around bed and walk in shower. Kerry is a fantastic Chef, and both Kerry and Rodrigo are a relaxed, friendly, fun & at the same time professional couple to be around. A charter with them is truly 1st Class!

Soterion (Lagoon 570) (previously DOUBLE FEATURE) A lovely Yacht, one guest liked her so much he bought her back in 2009! Sleeping 8 guests in 4 Queen Cabins(one with walk in shower), she has a spacious salon & cockpit area. Sasha and Tara have crewed Soterion for the almost 2 years keeping her updated each season. They are a lovely couple who delight in sharing their Caribbean experiences with you.

Avalon (Lagoon 620) is one of the newer boats to the fleet. Launched in 2010 with Paul and Mel who were involved throughout the build process, Avalon has been decorated tastefully throughout, she is fantastically spacious and has a lovely light and airy feel. She sleeps 10 guests and also offers diving. Both Paul and Mel are passionate about sailing and love to share their adventures with their guests. Their love for the islands shines through when they are sailing and showing you around. Mel is an accomplished Chef, always adding to her skills with new courses, she enjoys pushing herself to the next level in her gourmet offerings. Paul is an experienced Captain who is great fun to be around, he is always happy to show you the ropes (literally) or take on the sailing himself. A charter on this stunning new Yacht is sure to impress and Paul and Mel will leave you with memories hard to forget!

Kings Ransom (Matrix 76)- If you really want to be pampered in luxury then a charter on Kings Ransom is ideal. At 76ft this catamaran sleeps 10, all with ensuite bathrooms and walk in showers, the master cabin being particularly special with wraparound windows and a bath tub! The cockpit is very spacious with a large dining table, on the second deck there is plenty of sunbathing space and a hot tub! Your Crew Emily and Euros bring with them years of experience chartering. Emily is a masterful chef and Euros an accomplished Captain. Joining them to keep the level of service you would expect on a larger yacht like this are 2 further crew. If you want to enjoy that added bit of luxury Kings Ransom is where you will find it. Available not only in the BVI but throughout the Caribbean. Due to a recent cancellation Kings Ransom is now available for Christmas up until 26th December.

If you would like to enquire about any of these Yachts please drop us an Email ([email protected]).
If you cannot see what you are looking for here try using our Yacht Search Page to take a look at some other yachts or get in touch with us and we will recommend something more suited to your criteria. There are many wonderful yachts and crews out there to choose from, we want to help find the right one for YOU!

JK Yacht Charters, specialising in booking Luxury Crewed Yacht Charters in the Mediterranean and Caribbean. Representing 100’s of Boats, Crewed & Bareboat, Catamaran, Monohull & Motor Yachts.

[http://www.jkyachtcharters.com]

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The Ins and Outs of Crewed Yacht Charters

The yachts

There are about 250 crewed charter yachts around the Virgin Islands, spanning from 40′ monohulls to 100′ catamarans and motor yachts. These yachts are privately owned and run either by the owners or a hired crew. There will be a captain and a chef – also if they only have 2 guests – who will work hard to ensure the guests a wonderful adventure. The yachts can be categorized as tiny floating boutique hotels, with a service standard that even 5 star hotels can only dream about.

The rates start around $300/person/day and include the yacht and crew, all meals, beverages, running expenses and water sports equipment. The charters can start any day of the week and last as long as the guests wish.

The clearinghouses

The yachts are gathered in clearinghouses, which administer their calendars, payments, bookings etc. They arrange yearly boat shows, where the brokers can inspect the yachts and interview the crews and which often include a competition between the chefs. They are the link between the yachts and the brokers.

The brokers

To book a charter you need to find a charter yacht broker. Like any other profession, this requires a very specific knowledge. At the boat shows the brokers are gathering facts and personal impressions, meeting new crew and hear about upgrades on yachts they already know. Working closely with their clients, this knowledge becomes the base for matching them with the right yacht and crew, which lives up to their requirements. Besides an in-depth knowledge of the yachts, it is also important, that the broker is well travelled and knows the different destinations, where the charters take place.

The guests are often people with no sailing experience and it is up to the broker to keep the expectations realistic to make sure the vacation becomes a success.

Ulla Gotfredsen

Caribbean and Mediterranean Yacht Charters

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How to Get Work on a Cruise Ship as a Guest Entertainer Part IV

Dress Code

One of the advantages of being a guest entertainer is that we have passenger status
while on the ship, allowing us in to public areas where other crew members are not
allowed. We get to mix and mingle with passengers and over the years you will keep
meeting the repeat passengers and you can develop some very nice relationships.
On ships they usually have dress codes such as semi-formal and formal nights. You
are still employed by the cruise line, and like being employed in any job you are an
ambassador for the company, therefore you are expected to adhere to the dress
code for the evening and also dress in a smart and appropriate manner during
daytime hours.
Formal nights most men will wear tuxedos and the ladies are dressed in evening
gowns, on other nights I always wear a dress shirt and smart pants.

Gratuities

You are expected to pay gratuities to your cabin steward at passenger rates at the
end of the cruise. On some ships where we are in staff areas then the gratuities are
sleightly less because they only come in once a day and you won’t get the full
service as if you would if you were in a passenger area.
If you eat in the dining room then you must tip your waiter and busboy. As a rule if I
chose to eat in the dining room I always tip after my meal, but that isn’t very often
as I usually eat in the Buffet or Bistro.
On the ships now they often have an automatic charge of $10 per person per day
gratuity added to your bill, however you do not have to pay this unless you chose to.
This is what the passengers pay and it covers all gratuities including the dining
room. As I said, I never eat in the dining room and so only my cabin steward gets a
gratuity. If we chose to eat in another restaurant on the ship, rather than the buffet,
then of course we leave a tip. They usually recommend $3.50 per day for the cabin
steward in passenger areas.

Dining

You are allowed to dine in the passenger dining room and a buffets. Priority to
passengers must always be observed.

Usually the maitre d’ will have a special table put aside for guest entertainers,
although on many ships they have placed us with passengers. There are usually two
main sittings, one at 6pm and the other at 8.15pm. On the modern ships now they
promote open dining so you no longer have to have a seating assignment. Also with
the larger ships there is much more choice of dining from 24 hour Lido, Pizzeria,
Italian Restaurants, Chinese Restaurants and a Steak House. Of course each ship
differs with various restaurants. On the larger ships there will be a cover charge in
some restaurants such as the steak house charges $15.00 for the meal, the Italian
restaurant charges $25.00 per meal. All crew and passengers pay the same amount
to go to these specialality restaurants.

On vessels with alternate dining facilities, a cover charge will be made to all staff,
guest entertainers, and officers which are usually no more than $2.00. When you
join ask if there is such a list with the various charges, or ask another guest
entertainer who can tell you.

Dining in the officers’ mess is by invitation only.

Gambling

Ships are now like traveling resorts with all types of activities, one of the most
popular is the casino. You will need to check out what the rules are pertaining to
gambling on the ship you are to be working, but I know that the rules for the
company I work for state that guest entertainers and their guests and NOT
permitted to gamble onboard. This includes the casino, bingo, horse racing, and any
other gambling activities.
Note: Update, as of re-reading this article Guest Entertainers are NOW allowed to
gamble in the casino for the cruise line I work for.

Laundry and Dry Cleaning

Again, this varies from company to company, something you will need to check.
Ships are equipped with passenger laundrys where you can do your own washing.
However be warned … they can be dangerous. Many comedians joke about going to
the laundry room and seeing fights and arguments as passengers try to get hold of
a washing machine or dryer. Depending on the ship you might be allowed to use the
officers or crew laundry room which will not be so bad, but always check to make
sure it is okay. If you wish you send your laundry out for cleaning, then Guest
Entertainers are charge at the crew rate for their laundry and dry cleaning, again
check the regulations for the cruise line you are to be working for.

Medical

In most cases the company does not provide medical coverage and I strongly
recommend for you to arrange your own medical and health insurance plan. In my
contract it states that in the event of illness or injury during the term of the
contract, guest entertainers agree to look exclusively to their medical and health
insurers for payment of medical benefits and not to, in any way, hold the company
liable for such payments.
Visits to the ships doctor can be very expensive which is why medical insurance is
important, especially when traveling overseas.
If on the crew list then more often that not a visit to the doctor will not cost
anything, and if they want you to get an injection such as Yellow Fever of the Flu
Injection then they will not charge. It all depends on the doctor and ships policy.

To see Paul Romhany on stage is to witness a magical transformation. While his skills and artistry as an illusionist are unsurpassed, Paul takes his performance to another dimension when he applies makeup as the audience watches, suddenly leaving behind Paul Romhany and becoming Charlie Chaplin. It is a mesmerizing spectacle as “The Little Tramp”, Chaplin’s most famous character, emerges to complete the illusion.

Paul Romhany got his start in his native New Zealand, earning his degree in music from Auckland University. A piano certificate from London’s Royal College of Music followed, but Paul’s passion remained in theatre. Soon he was travelling the globe performing to universal acclaim and recognition with such awards as Entertainer of the Year in his home country and International Gold Medal Magic Champion in 2003. He has performed in over 50 countries and 17 national television appearances including two years on New Zealand Television with a double magic act. visit:http://www.chaplinmagic.com

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What to Expect From Your Yacht Charter Crew

A good yacht charter crew has a simple and complicated job — do everything they possibly can to ensure that your trip becomes the best, most memorable vacation for you. They truly do, is they’re really good and competitive. So, they’ll grant any of your reasonable request. The following will give you an idea on what to expect from your crewed yacht charter trip:

They’ll discuss with you the every-day itinerary that will conform to your your wishes at the start of the trip and every morning based on the weather conditions and the mood of your group; they’ll keep the yacht look and smell clean; they’ll be at anchor with drinks ready just before the sun sets; they’ll set up the windsurf board three times a day if needed; they’ll cook your meals based on your preferences. Also, they’ll allow you to, or teach you how to steer the yacht (under supervision) if you like them to; they’ll be very discrete if you feel like being romantic with your spouse; they’ll take you to a great snorkeling spot; they’ll be very patient with children, teach them things like knot tying; and they’ll pick you up at the restaurant or at the beach using the dinghy. In general, most good yacht crews do way more than these.

Overall, they’ll be super nice (they should be) since you’re the source of their livelihood and the least thing they want is for you to send a bad after-trip report to the broker or the yacht charter firm.

Now, let’s discuss how you and your party should behave? Basically, there are two vital types of situations where problems can happen.

1. Safety:
Do not insist if the Captain informs you that it’s presently unsafe to go to a certain place, even if it’s included in your itinerary. Keep in mind that he’s a professional and he’s responsible to the safety of everyone on board. So, try not to push him; he can be very firm if he has to.

2. General Courtesy

As a guest on board, you are also expected to show some courteousness. Try not to be arrogant, unreasonably dirty or messy, and unruly after a party involving drinks. Some guests see the members of their crew as servants. Actually, they are not. They’re professional seaman hosts who are trying to do a tough job the best they could. And for this, they should be treated with friendliness and respect.

Additionally, it’s a tradition to treat crew members a dinner on shore at least once during the trip (usually the last night). You’re not required to, but it’s definitely a nice gesture of appreciation for the services you’re received; or at least offer.

And very importantly, if you’re truly satisfied with your trip, give a gratuity to your yacht charter crew. Not all yacht charter firm brochures or websites will mention about gratuity. But know that the traditionally accepted gratuity starts from 10 per cent to 15 per cent of the total yacht rental fee. Some guests are even glad to give up to 20%. gratuities represent around 50 per cent of the total earnings of a yacht charter crew.

For a fun-filled, memorable yacht charter cruise, choose a yacht rental firm with excellent, highly-trained, and courteous crew. Visit the CCY team to learn more: http://www.ccy.com.au

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